Why some black-owned U.S. businesses are hardest hit by coronavirus shutdowns

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After 15 years working as a hair stylist in other people’s salons, Gary Connell opened his “Healthy Hair” studio in Montgomery County, Maryland in early March, sinking his savings into a two-chair shop in a busy mall.

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WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) – After 15 years working as a hair stylist in other people’s salons, Gary Connell opened his “Healthy Hair” studio in Montgomery County, Maryland in early March, sinking his savings into a two-chair shop in a busy mall.

As her company’s only employee, she decided not to apply for a PPP loan, but said she could benefit more from a flexible loan to help her rebuild inventory.

“It’s just so hard to get the capital we need,” said Johns. “When you’re strapped for cash it’s a very difficult balancing act.”

Reporting by Katanga Johnson and Jonnelle Marte; additional reporting by Makini Brice; Editing by Heather Timmons and Grant McCool


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Author:

After 15 years working as a hair stylist in other people’s salons, Gary Connell opened his “Healthy Hair” studio in Montgomery County, Maryland in early March, sinking his savings into a two-chair shop in a busy mall.

Source: {authorlink}

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